January 20, 2022

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Tanzania Travel Advisory

13 min read

Reconsider travel to Tanzania due to COVID-19. Exercise increased caution in Tanzania due to crime, terrorism, and targeting of LGBTI persons.

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.  

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a Level 3 Travel Health Notice for the Tanzania due to COVID-19.

Tanzania has lifted stay at home orders, and resumed some transportation options, and businesses operations. Visit the Embassy’s COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in Tanzania.

Country Summary: Violent crime, such as assault, sexual assault, robberies, mugging, and carjacking, is common. Local police may lack the resources to respond effectively to serious crime.

Terrorist groups continue plotting possible attacks in Tanzania. Terrorists may attack with little or no warning, targeting embassies, police stations, mosques, and other places frequented by Westerners.

Members of the LGBTI community have been arrested, targeted, harassed, and/or charged with unrelated offenses. Individuals detained under suspicion of same-sex sexual conduct could be subject to forced anal examinations.

Read the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Tanzania:

  • See the U.S. Embassy’s web page regarding COVID-19.
  • Visit the CDC’s webpage on Travel and COVID-19.
  • Always carry a copy of your U.S. passport and visa and keep original documents in a secure location.
  • Be aware of your surroundings.
  • Do not leave your food or drink unattended.
  • Stay alert in all locations, especially those frequented by Westerners.
  • Avoid public displays of affection particularly between same-sex couples.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter
  • Review the Crime and Safety Report for Tanzania.
  • Prepare a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.

Last Update: Reissued with updates to COVID-19 information.

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