January 24, 2022

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Submission to Congress of the Executive Summary of the Report on Adherence to and Compliance with Arms Control, Nonproliferation, and Disarmament Agreements and Commitments (Compliance Report)

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Office of the Spokesperson

The Executive Summary of the 2020 Report on Adherence to and Compliance with Arms Control, Nonproliferation, and Disarmament Agreements and Commitments, otherwise known as the Compliance Report, has been submitted to Congress.  The Executive Summary, inter alia,  contains findings of other nations’ compliance with and adherence to arms control, nonproliferation, and disarmament agreements and commitments in which the United States is also a participant. The Executive Summary may be found at https://www.state.gov/2020-adherence-to-and-compliance-with-arms-control-nonproliferation-and-disarmament-agreements-and-commitments-compliance-report/.

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    In U.S GAO News
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