January 22, 2022

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Statement from Attorney General William P. Barr on the Resignation of Seattle Police Chief Carmen Best

11 min read
<div>Attorney General William P. Barr issued the following statement in response to the resignation of Seattle Police Chief Carmen Best:</div>

Attorney General William P. Barr issued the following statement in response to the resignation of Seattle Police Chief Carmen Best:

“I was disheartened to learn of the resignation of Seattle Police Chief Carmen Best.  Her leadership and demonstrated commitment to her oath of office reflected all that is good about America’s law enforcement.  In the face of mob violence, she drew the line in the sand and said, “Enough!”, working tirelessly to save lives, protect her officers, and restore stability to Seattle.  Her example should be an inspiration to all who respect the rule of law and cherish safety and security in their communities.  This experience should be a lesson to state and local leaders about the real costs of irresponsible proposals to defund the police.”

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