January 19, 2022

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Statement by Attorney General William P. Barr on Mexico’s Proposed Legislation

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<div>Attorney General William P. Barr gave the following statement in response to Mexico's proposed legislation:</div>

Attorney General William P. Barr gave the following statement in response to Mexico’s proposed legislation. 

“The Department of Justice is committed to working with the Government of Mexico to fight the transnational criminals who threaten both our nations.  As always, our cooperation takes place within the longstanding framework designed to address jointly our shared challenges: that is why, for example, the United States recently returned former Secretary Cienfuegos to Mexico, in order to allow him to be investigated there.  Thus, we are troubled by legislation currently before the Mexican Congress, which would have the effect of making cooperation between our countries more difficult.  This would make the citizens of Mexico and the United States less safe.  The passage of this legislation can only benefit the violent transnational criminal organizations and other criminals that we are jointly fighting.”

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