January 24, 2022

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Statement from Acting Solicitor General Jeffrey B. Wall on the Passing of Former Solicitor General Drew S. Days III

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<div>Today, Acting Solicitor General Jeffrey B. Wall issued the following statement on the passing of former Solicitor General Drew S. Days III:</div>

Today, Acting Solicitor General Jeffrey B. Wall issued the following statement on the passing of former Solicitor General Drew S. Days III:

“We are saddened to learn of the passing yesterday of former Solicitor General Drew Days.  As Solicitor General from 1993 to 1996, Drew Days was a distinguished advocate for the United States before the Supreme Court, a wise leader for this office, and a cherished colleague.  His career outside the office was no less remarkable.  He was a trailblazing civil-rights litigator for the NAACP Legal Defense Fund, the respected head of the Justice Department’s Civil Rights Division, and a beloved professor at Yale Law School for many decades.  His colleagues at the Solicitor General’s Office will remember Drew as a kind and gentle soul with a firm commitment to principle.  We offer our deepest condolences to his family and join the legal community in mourning his passing.”

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