December 4, 2021

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State Department Employee Wins National Clean Energy Award

18 min read

Office of the Spokesperson

Ms. Faith Corneille, Global Power Sector Program Manager in the Bureau of Energy Resources (ENR) at the U.S. Department of State, will receive the U.S. Clean Energy Education & Empowerment (C3E) Mid-Career Award for Government for her work supporting the clean energy transition. Ms. Corneille is one of nine women from a range of organizations recognized by the C3E Initiative. The U.S. C3E Initiative is led by the U.S. Department of Energy in collaboration with Stanford University’s Precourt Institute for Energy, the Texas A&M Energy Institute, and the MIT Energy Initiative. C3E aims to close the gender gap and increase the participation, leadership, and success of women in clean energy fields.

In her current role leading ENR’s Power Sector Program, Ms. Corneille oversees electric power sector technical engagement worldwide. She designs and leads technical assistance projects in Latin America, Asia, Africa, and Europe to help governments meet their renewable energy goals, reform their power markets, increase regional power trade, and attract clean energy investment.

The winners of the 2021 U.S. C3E Awards will be honored by U.S. Secretary of Energy Jennifer Granholm at the Tenth Annual U.S. C3E Women in Clean Energy Symposium and Awards, to be held virtually on Nov. 3, 12:30 p.m. ET to 4:30 p.m. ET, and Nov. 4, 12 p.m. ET to 3:30 p.m. ET.

For further information, please contact Keith Ketchum at KetchumKP@state.gov or 202-805-1936, or visit 2021— The Clean Energy Education & Empowerment (C3E) Initiative or @C3E_EnergyWomen on Twitter.

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