January 23, 2022

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Special Envoy Lenderking and Chargé Westley’s Visit to Aden, Yemen

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Ned Price, Department Spokesperson

U.S. Special Envoy for Yemen Tim Lenderking and Chargé d’Affaires of the U.S. Embassy to Yemen Cathy Westley visited Aden, Yemen today.  During the trip, they met with Prime Minister Maeen Abdulmalek Saeed, Foreign Minister Ahmed Bin Mubarak, Aden Governor Lamlas, other senior government officials, and representatives of Yemeni civil society.

The visit comes at a time when Yemenis are suffering from extreme economic instability as well as security threats.  Special Envoy Lenderking emphasized that now is the time for all Yemenis to come together to end this war and enact bold reforms to revive the economy, counter corruption, and alleviate suffering.

Chargé Westley underscored that the United States welcomes the commitment of the Prime Minister and endorses the government’s presence in Yemen but the government must do more to enact reforms that will help ease the suffering caused by the war.

The U.S. delegation urged the Yemeni Government to continue to strengthen internal coordination, including with the Southern Transitional Council and other groups, as division weakens all parties and only exacerbates suffering.  During their conversations, the U.S. delegation and the Republic of Yemen Government discussed how the Houthis’ offensive on Marib is exacerbating the humanitarian situation and obstructing peace.

The U.S. Government calls on regional and other countries to increase economic support for Yemen, noting that improving basic services and economic opportunity is an important step to building a stronger foundation for peace.

This visit demonstrates that the United States remains committed to helping Yemenis shape a brighter future for their country.

More from: Ned Price, Department Spokesperson
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