December 3, 2021

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Special Envoy for the Horn of Africa Feltman to Speak on Ethiopia

9 min read

Office of the Spokesperson

On Tuesday, November 2, Special Envoy for the Horn of Africa Jeffrey Feltman will give remarks at an event hosted by the United States Institute for Peace. As the crisis in Ethiopia nears its one-year anniversary, Special Envoy Feltman will address U.S.-Ethiopia policy and the urgent need for a peaceful resolution to the conflict.

More information for this USIP event can be found at https://www.usip.org/events/taking-stock-us-policy-ethiopia-conversation-ambassador-jeffrey-feltman<https://gcc02.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.usip.org%2Fevents%2Ftaking-stock-us-policy-ethiopia-conversation-ambassador-jeffrey-feltman&data=04%7C01%7CBinderDR%40state.gov%7C1cbaf814be4f49f13c8408d99d7f9925%7C66cf50745afe48d1a691a12b2121f44b%7C0%7C0%7C637713993615682870%7CUnknown%7CTWFpbGZsb3d8eyJWIjoiMC4wLjAwMDAiLCJQIjoiV2luMzIiLCJBTiI6Ik1haWwiLCJXVCI6Mn0%3D%7C1000&sdata=6cek2QCDjyeZs7l0r8nB69f3Yp%2F75FCJlema4DIHsL4%3D&reserved=0>. The event will be live streamed on State.gov.

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