December 4, 2021

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South Florida Addiction Treatment Facility Operators Convicted in $112 Million Addiction Treatment Fraud Scheme

12 min read
<div>After a seven-week trial, a federal jury in the Southern District of Florida convicted two operators of two South Florida addiction treatment facilities for fraudulently billing approximately $112 million for services that were never provided or were medically unnecessary, and for paying  kickbacks to patients through patient recruiters, and receiving kickbacks from testing laboratories. One defendant was also convicted of money laundering, and of separate charges of bank fraud connected to Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) loans.</div>
After a seven-week trial, a federal jury in the Southern District of Florida convicted two operators of two South Florida addiction treatment facilities for fraudulently billing approximately $112 million for services that were never provided or were medically unnecessary, and for paying  kickbacks to patients through patient recruiters, and receiving kickbacks from testing laboratories. One defendant was also convicted of money laundering, and of separate charges of bank fraud connected to Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) loans.

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