January 19, 2022

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Sierra Leone Travel Advisory

22 min read

Reconsider travel to Sierra Leone due to COVID-19. Exercise increased caution in Sierra Leone due to crime.

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.  

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a Level 3 Travel Health Notice for Sierra Leone due to COVID-19.  

Sierra Leone has resumed most transportation options (including airport operations and re-opening of borders) and business operations (including day cares and schools). Other improved conditions have been reported within Sierra Leone. Visit the Embassy’s COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in Sierra Leone.

Country Summary: Violent crime, such as armed robbery, and assault, is common. Local police lack the resources, capacity, and training to respond effectively to serious criminal incidents.

The U.S. government is unable to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens outside Freetown at night as U.S. government employees are prohibited from traveling outside the capital after dark.

Read the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Sierra Leone:

  • See the U.S. Embassy’s web page regarding COVID-19. 
  • Visit the CDC’s webpage on Travel and COVID-19.   
  • Do not physically resist any robbery attempt.
  • Do not display signs of wealth, such as expensive watches or jewelry.
  • Use caution when walking or driving at night.
  • Always carry a copy of your U.S. passport and visa (if applicable). Keep original documents in a secure location.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
  • Review the Crime and Safety Report for Sierra Leone.
  • Prepare a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.

Last Update: Reissued with updates to COVID-19 information.

 

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