December 5, 2021

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Senior Official for Public Diplomacy and Public Affairs Jennifer Hall Godfrey’s Travel to the United Arab Emirates and Germany

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Office of the Spokesperson

Senior Official for Public Diplomacy and Public Affairs Jennifer Hall Godfrey will travel to the United Arab Emirates November 2-4 to visit the USA Pavilion at Expo 2020 in Dubai. She will meet with USA Pavilion staff including Youth Ambassadors from the United States. She will also meet with senior officials from the Emirati government to discuss cultural cooperation and promote mutual understanding. Senior Official Hall Godfrey will then travel to Berlin, Germany November 4-6 to meet with think tank, social media, and civil society leaders to discuss our common values and strengthen the transatlantic relationship.

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