December 3, 2021

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Senior Advisor Hochstein’s Trip to Israel

14 min read

Office of the Spokesperson

Senior Advisor for Global Energy Security Amos Hochstein will visit Israel and the West Bank November 7-8.  During his trip Senior Advisor Hochstein will meet with Israeli and Palestinian senior officials to discuss energy security. Additionally, he will discuss maritime negotiations with Israeli officials.

 

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