January 29, 2022

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Senegal Travel Advisory

14 min read

Reconsider travel to Senegal due to COVID-19.   Some areas have increased risk. Read the entire Travel Advisory.

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.   

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a level 3 Travel Health Notice for Senegal due to COVID-19.  

Senegal has lifted stay at home orders, and resumed some transportation options and business operations.  Visit the Embassy’s COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in Senegal.

Exercise Increased Caution In:

  • The Casamance region due to crime and landmines

Read the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Senegal:

Casamance Region–Exercise Increased Caution

Armed individuals have set up roadblocks and attacked travelers on roads south of The Gambia in the Casamance region of Senegal.

Land mines from prior conflicts remain in the Casamance Region.

The U.S. government has limited ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens in this area. U.S. government employees are prohibited from travelling on National Route 4 south of Ziguinchor, on Route 20 between Ziguinchor and Cap Skirring, and on unpaved roads without armed escorts. U.S. government employees are also prohibited from travelling after dark.

Last Update: Reissued with updates to COVID-19 information.

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