January 27, 2022

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Secretary Pompeo’s Quad Meeting with Japanese Foreign Minister Motegi, Indian Foreign Minister Jaishankar, and Australian Foreign Minister Payne

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Office of the Spokesperson

The below is attributable to Principal Deputy Spokesperson Cale Brown:‎

Secretary of State Michael R. Pompeo met today with Japanese Foreign Minister Toshimitsu Motegi, Indian Minister of External Affairs Dr. S. Jaishankar, and Australian Foreign Minister Marise Payne to reaffirm collective Quad efforts to advance a free, open, and inclusive Indo-Pacific. In regard to responding to the COVID-19 pandemic, the participants discussed ways to deepen cooperation to create resilient supply chains, promote transparency, counter disinformation, and advance shared efforts to support a post-pandemic recovery.

The participants also reviewed recent strategic developments across the Indo-Pacific and discussed ways to enhance Quad cooperation on maritime security, cybersecurity and data flows, quality infrastructure, counterterrorism and other areas.  The four countries reaffirmed their strong support for ASEAN centrality, sovereignty, and an ASEAN-led regional architecture for the Indo-Pacific. They pledged to continue regular consultations to advance the vision of a peaceful, secure, and prosperous Indo-Pacific through engagements among senior officials, subject matter experts, and Ministers.

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