January 22, 2022

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Secretary Pompeo’s Meeting with Japanese National Security Secretariat Secretary General Shigeru Kitamura

7 min read

Office of the Spokesperson

The following is attributable to Spokesperson Morgan Ortagus:

Today, Secretary of State Michael R. Pompeo met with the Japanese National Security Secretariat Secretary General Shigeru Kitamura in Washington, D.C. Secretary Pompeo congratulated Secretary General Kitamura on his re-appointment as Secretary General following Prime Minister Suga’s election on September 16. Secretary Pompeo and Secretary General Kitamura reaffirmed that the U.S.-Japan Alliance is the cornerstone of peace, security, and prosperity in a free and open Indo-Pacific.

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