January 24, 2022

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Secretary Pompeo’s Meeting with Indian External Affairs Minister Jaishankar

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Office of the Spokesperson

The following is attributable to Principal Deputy Spokesperson Cale Brown:‎

Secretary of State Michael R. Pompeo met today with Indian Minister of External Affairs Dr. S. Jaishankar on the margins of the United States-India-Australia-Japan Quadrilateral Consultations.  Secretary Pompeo and Minister Jaishankar discussed ongoing bilateral and multilateral cooperation on topics of international concern.  They reaffirmed the strength of the United States-India relationship, reviewed our efforts to combat the COVID-19 pandemic, and asserted the need to work together to advance peace, prosperity, and security in the Indo-Pacific and around the globe.  The Secretary and the Minister agreed to continue close cooperation on a full range of regional and international issues and look forward to the U.S.-India 2+2 Ministerial Dialogue later this year.

 

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