January 20, 2022

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Secretary Pompeo’s Meeting with French President Macron

12 min read

Office of the Spokesperson

The below is attributable to Principal Deputy Spokesperson Cale Brown:‎

Secretary of State Michael R. Pompeo met with French President Emmanuel Macron today in Paris, France.  Secretary Pompeo and President Macron discussed significant threats to global security, efforts to counter violent extremism, Iran’s destabilizing behavior, and Hizballah’s malign influence in Lebanon.  The Secretary stressed the importance of the Transatlantic alliance and NATO unity and highlighted our strong cooperation in the Indo-Pacific region, as well as efforts to counter the Chinese Communist Party.

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