January 22, 2022

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Secretary Pompeo’s Meeting with Australian Foreign Minister Payne

20 min read

Office of the Spokesperson

The following is attributable to Principal Deputy Spokesperson Cale Brown:

Secretary of State Michael R. Pompeo met with Australian Foreign Minister Marise Payne today in Tokyo, Japan on the sidelines of the U.S.-Australia-India-Japan Ministerial (“the Quad”). Secretary Pompeo and Foreign Minister Payne emphasized the importance of the Quad discussions to the promotion of peace, security and prosperity in the Indo-Pacific. The Secretary and the Foreign Minister also discussed their shared concerns regarding the People’s Republic of China’s malign activity in the region.  Secretary Pompeo thanked Foreign Minister Payne for Australia’s leadership and coordination as a vital partner with the United States on COVID-19 response and recovery.

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