December 9, 2021

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Secretary Pompeo’s Call with Partners on COVID-19

15 min read

Office of the Spokesperson

The following is attributable to Spokesperson Morgan Ortagus:

Secretary of State Michael R. Pompeo spoke today with the Foreign Ministers of Australia, Brazil, India, Israel, and the Republic of Korea.  Secretary Pompeo and his counterparts discussed the importance of continued close coordination in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.  They noted the importance of close cooperation to reopen our economies and counter disinformation, while also addressing the need for concerted efforts to prevent future pandemics.

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