January 25, 2022

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Secretary Pompeo’s Call with NATO Secretary General Stoltenberg 

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Office of the Spokesperson

The following is attributable to Principal Deputy Spokesperson Cale Brown:‎

Secretary of State Michael R. Pompeo spoke today with NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg to emphasize the importance of unity and a common approach to security within the NATO Alliance ahead of the December 1-2 Foreign Ministerial.  Secretary Pompeo also conveyed the United States’ steadfast support for Transatlantic unity and NATO’s efforts.

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