January 22, 2022

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Secretary Pompeo’s Call with Kuwaiti Foreign Minister Al Sabah

14 min read

Office of the Spokesperson

The below is attributable to Spokesperson Morgan Ortagus:

Secretary of State Michael R. Pompeo spoke today with Kuwaiti Foreign Minister Sheikh Ahmad Nasser Al Mohammad Al Sabah.  Secretary Pompeo expressed his deepest condolences on the death of His Highness Sheikh Sabah Al Ahmad Al Jaber Al Sabah and praised the late leader for being a friend and great partner to many nations.  The Secretary noted the United States is committed to the strong bilateral relationship it enjoys with Kuwait, and that we look forward to honoring the Amir’s legacy, together, by continuing to promote regional stability and security.

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