January 25, 2022

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Secretary Pompeo’s Call with Foreign Minister Mahuta 

4 min read

Office of the Spokesperson

The following is attributable to Principal Deputy Spokesperson Cale Brown:

Secretary of State Michael R. Pompeo spoke today with New Zealand Foreign Minister Nanaia Mahuta.  Secretary Pompeo congratulated Foreign Minister Mahuta on her appointment as foreign minister, and they discussed issues important to the bilateral relationship, including development assistance and COVID-19 responses in the Pacific islands.  The Secretary and the Foreign Minister agreed to continue cooperating to promote our shared democratic ideals in the Indo-Pacific and international organizations

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