January 27, 2022

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Secretary Pompeo’s Call with Australian Foreign Minister Payne

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Office of the Spokesperson

The following is attributable to Principal Deputy Spokesperson Cale Brown:

Secretary of State Michael R. Pompeo spoke today with Australian Foreign Minister Marise Payne. During the call, Secretary Pompeo and the Foreign Minister Payne reaffirmed the strength of the U.S.-Australia Alliance, which is based on shared values of democracy, human rights, and the rule of law, common strategic interests, and our enduring “mateship.” The Secretary and the Foreign Minister also discussed the growing importance of the Quad’s collective efforts to advance a free, open, and inclusive Indo-Pacific region, and our ongoing coordination to counter the escalating threats from the PRC to our economies.

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