January 29, 2022

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Secretary Pompeo to Receive the International Republican Institute’s Freedom Award

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Office of the Spokesperson

Secretary of State Michael R. Pompeo will receive the International Republican Institute’s Freedom Award during a virtual ceremony at 6:00 p.m. on Tuesday, October 13, 2020. Secretary Pompeo will deliver virtual remarks following the presentation of the award at approximately 6:15 p.m.

The Secretary’s remarks will be live streamed on www.state.gov.

For more information, please contact the International Republican Institute at media@iri.org or the Department of State’s Office of Press Relations via e-mail at PAPressDuty@state.gov.

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