January 29, 2022

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Secretary Pompeo to Host [pre-recorded] Virtual Conference on Combatting Online Anti-Semitism

13 min read

Office of the Spokesperson

Secretary of State Michael R. Pompeo will host and deliver opening remarks during the first-ever U.S. Government conference focused on combatting online anti-Semitism.  Organized by the Office of the Special Envoy to Monitor and Combat Anti-Semitism, the virtual conference aims to explore the threats posed by anti-Semitism on the internet and social media and to consider practical responses for governments and civil society.

The conference, titled “Ancient Hatred, Modern Medium,” will be on the record and shown virtually on the State Department website on October 21 and 22 from 1:00 pm to approximately 4:00 pm EDT.

In addition to Secretary Pompeo, U.S. Government presenters will include Deputy Attorney General Jeffrey Rosen, Senator James Lankford, Representative Debbie Wasserman Schultz,  Special Envoy to Monitor and Combat Anti-Semitism Elan Carr, and Special Envoy for Holocaust Issues Cherrie Daniels.

The presentations will feature foreign leaders, including Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and Minister Orit Farkash-Hacohen of Israel, Minister Michael Gove of the United Kingdom, Federal National Council Member Dr. Ali Al Nuaimi of the United Arab Emirates, International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance President Ambassador Michaela Küchler, European Commission Coordinator on Combating Anti-Semitism Katharina von Schnurbein, and UN Special Rapporteur on Freedom of Religion or Belief Dr. Ahmed Shaheed.

Also presenting will be representatives of social media platforms and leaders from religious communities, civil society, and academia.

Media representatives may view the presentations beginning at 1:00 pm EDT on October 21st  using the following link: www.state.gov/anti-semitism-conference

For further information, please contact the Office of Press Relations at (202) 647-2492 or Assistant Special Envoy to Monitor and Combat Anti-Semitism Efraim Cohen (cohene@state.gov).

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