January 19, 2022

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Secretary Pompeo to Deliver Remarks to the Media in the Press Briefing Room

15 min read

Office of the Spokesperson

Secretary of State Michael R. Pompeo will deliver remarks to the media at 1:00 p.m. on Tuesday, November 10, 2020 in the Press Briefing Room at the Department of State.

Out of an abundance of caution in order to practice safe social distancing practices, the Secretary’s remarks to the media will be pooled press coverage only.

Media representatives may call into the briefing. Dial-in information is below and we encourage calling from a landline, if possible:

  • United States: 877-226-8215
  • International: 409-207-6982
  • Access Code: 1007955
  • Conference Name: “State Department Press Briefing”

Reporters who wish to pose a question to Secretary Pompeo should get in queue prior to the briefing start time by dialing 10 on their telephone keypad.

The event will be streamed live on https://www.state.gov/.

For further information, please contact the Office of Press Relations at PAPressDuty@state.gov.

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