January 25, 2022

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Secretary of State’s Award for Corporate Excellence (ACE)

16 min read

Office of the Spokesperson

Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken will recognize six U.S. companies for their representation of American values and international best practices in their operations overseas during the 2021 ACE awards ceremony on December 8.  This year’s ACE focuses on three categories that align with key priorities for the United States – climate innovation, health security, and economic inclusion.  As part of the Department of State’s support for small business, this year’s ACE ceremony will recognize two winners in each category – one small-to-medium-sized enterprise and one larger company.  After Secretary Blinken’s announcement of the award recipients, the Chiefs of Mission of nominating U.S. embassies and senior representatives from the awardee companies will give remarks.  Under Secretary of State for Economic Growth, Energy, and the Environment Jose W. Fernandez will close the ceremony.

This virtual event is open to the press and can be viewed live at www.state.gov.  The awards ceremony begins at 9:00am on December 8, 2021 and will last approximately one hour.

For access to images of the award presentations, releasable after the conclusion of the ceremony, contact the Bureau of Economic and Business Affairs Press Office at EB-Press-Inquiry@state.gov.

For further information, please go to www.state.gov/ace.

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