January 22, 2022

News

News Network

Secretary Michael R. Pompeo And Kuwaiti Foreign Minister Sheikh Ahmad Nasser Al-Mohammad Al-Sabah

14 min read

Michael R. Pompeo, Secretary of State

Washington, D.C.

SECRETARY POMPEO:  Good morning, everyone.  And good evening to those watching in Kuwait.

Dr. Ahmad, it’s wonderful to be with you, to host you and your team here in Washington, D.C. The foreign minister and I just completed a great conversation, a productive gathering, and our teams have been doing the same.  These annual meetings each time have been more productive than the one previously.  And that’s in good part because of the goodwill of our two teams and the important relationship between our two countries.

Kuwait is one of our most important strategic partners throughout the Middle East.  And our administration has worked hard to deepen the historic bonds between our two countries. Indeed, we’re grateful that the late Amir made these ties even closer.

Once again, I want to express my condolences to the people of Kuwait for the Amir’s death earlier this year.  Our work today honors him, builds on his proud legacy in several key areas.  He opened up new ways for us to think and work and talk together.

I want to start with a topic that’s on everyone’s mind: the battle against the pandemic from Wuhan.

Many people in America, in Kuwait, and around the world are suffering because the Chinese Communist Party failed to properly alert the world that it had a public health disaster on its hands.  It silenced brave Chinese citizens.

It’s wonderful that the United States and Kuwait have been able to work together on our preparedness to make sure we are ready to tackle public health challenges alongside each other.

During our dialogue just now, we signed an MOU to increase our cooperation in areas like biomedical research and information sharing.

And we finalized another MOU today between the Kuwait Fund and the State Department’s USAID.

Thanks to that agreement, we’ll coordinate on assistance on everything from energy to food security as well.   As two of the most generous donor nation countries in the world, the United States and Kuwait are proud to work together to help those in need and to save lives.

On the economic front, we signed last year to increase entrepreneurship and grow small and medium-sized enterprises in Kuwait, and we’re already producing success stories.  It contributed to the $4.5 billion in bilateral trade between our countries in calendar year 2019.

This pandemic has put a halt to a lot of the movement of goods and people.  But I am confident –   I’m confident that as we move forward, we’ll soon see more trade, more investment, and students and businesspeople traveling much more frequently between our two countries.

Finally, too, our strong security relationship.  Next year is the 30th anniversary of Operation Desert Storm and the liberation of Kuwait from Saddam’s bloody tyranny – three decades.  America and Kuwait’s relationship has been built around security cooperation ever since that time.

Today, Kuwait and Iraq collaborate closely and build ties to peace and prosperity, while Kuwait hosts thousands of United States troops who work closely with both militaries.  This is a model of progress, and I thank the Kuwaiti people for the good work that they do to support our soldiers, sailors, airmen inside of Kuwait.

Our two nations are also united on the challenges of our time.  We fought together to defeat ISIS’s fraudulent caliphate.

And we’re aligned in countering the Iranian regime as well.  And I want to thank Kuwait for its support of the maximum pressure campaign.  Together, we are denying Tehran money, resources, wealth, weapons with which they would be able to commit terror acts all across the region.

We’re working to resolve other conflicts as well.  The foreign minister and the Kuwaitis have been models in moving forward to heal the Gulf rift, and their assistance continues to be of great importance in that respect.

And as I said last year in Kuwait, President Trump and I both believe the ongoing dispute has dragged on for too long.  It only benefits our adversaries.

Dr. Ahmad, thank you for your friendship.  Thank you for joining me here today.

And thank you to the people of Kuwait for being true friends of us here in the United States.  Thank you.

FOREIGN MINISTER AHMAD:  Thank you, Mr. Secretary, my dear friend Secretary Pompeo.  Thank you so much for hosting us and thank you so much for hosting the fourth dialogue meeting here in Washington.

I would like first to recall the deepest appreciation from His Highness the Amir, the leadership, the government, and people of Kuwait for all that you have done for the latest Highness the Amir, providing the medevac airplane and all of the health care for the latest Highness the Amir, and also bestowing upon the latest Highness the Amir, the Legion of Merit.  It’s something that will always be appreciative in Kuwait.

Also I would like to express the great gratitude of the leadership of Kuwait for the continuous, relentless commitment of United States in the security of Kuwait, but also of the region, and of the cooperation that we have in this regard.

As you have said, Your Excellency, next year will mark two events, important events – will mark 30 years of the liberation of Kuwait, where the United States and the leadership of United States guided the coalition of 35 nations around the world in meeting international security, international law in liberating Kuwait.  Also it will mark 60 years of establishing diplomatic relationship with United States, and we’ll work very hard for those two events to have its matter here in Washington, but also there in Kuwait.

The maintaining this Strategic Dialogue is very important now.  For the past four years, we see progress in all fields and sectors, and they are numerous.  And the six working groups now have made tremendous advance in our bilateral relationship, on the defense, security, economy, education, health, and human rights.

Now with the challenges of COVID, Your Excellency, also we think that there are some fields and sectors to enhance our collaboration in them.  And as you have mentioned, we are now in –  either in securing and maintaining and enhancing and bolstering our health institutions, but also in food security.

The relationship and bilateral relationship and since the creation of the fourth dialogue meeting, it has given us a clear caliber to gauge the advancement in our relationship.  It has institutionalized our relationship, and for the past four years, for example, in finance, we have risen our investment to 17 percent in the last four years.

Our trade also advanced to over 14 billion from 2016 to 2020.  The role also of all of those who want to seek education here in the United States is advancing in a very clear speed, and we are also very much in support of that.  Now, somewhat 90,000 Kuwaitis are enjoying the education here in Kuwait.  We are also combating, as Your Excellency mentioned, against terrorism, and also enhancing our cooperation in cybersecurity.

We all – we have a beautiful story between United States and Kuwait, and we will make sure that will – this story will even transpire even for future generations to come.

I thank you again, Your Excellency.

SECRETARY POMPEO:  Thank you very much.

News Network

  • Law Firms Representing Purdue Pharma Agree to Relinquish $1 Million in Settlement with U.S. Trustee Program
    In Crime News
    The Department of Justice’s U.S. Trustee Program (USTP) has entered into a settlement with three law firms representing Purdue Pharma (Purdue) in its ongoing bankruptcy cases. The firms are Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom LLP; Wilmer Cutler Pickering Hale and Dorr LLP; and Dechert LLP (the Firms). 
    [Read More…]
  • Secretary Antony J. Blinken to U.S. Mission Mexico
    In Crime Control and Security News
    Antony J. Blinken, [Read More…]
  • VA Real Property: Preliminary Observations on Challenges Limiting VA’s Ability to Effectively Manage Its Assets
    In U.S GAO News
    What GAO Found GAO has identified key characteristics of an asset management framework designed to optimize funding and decision-making related to capital assets. The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) continues to have challenges meeting at least three of these key characteristics. Staffing resources. This key characteristic calls for organizational leadership to provide the necessary resources for asset management to succeed. Previously, VA officials described problems resulting from low levels of staffing resources, including project delays and difficulties in managing projects. VA has taken some actions to improve staffing levels, such as establishing special salary rates for engineers, and VA's vacancy rate for general engineers has improved, decreasing from 17.2 percent in fiscal year 2019 to 12.6 percent in fiscal year 2020. VA officials, however, continue to describe staffing difficulties in planning and executing projects and limits on the number of projects that facilities can undertake. Communication and collaboration. This key characteristic calls for organizations to promote a culture of information-sharing across traditional agency boundaries to help ensure that agencies make effective, enterprise-wide decisions regarding their assets. VA has taken steps to improve communication among offices with asset management responsibilities, such as by issuing an asset management directive that VA officials said would help to facilitate such collaboration. However, in current work GAO has found instances of insufficient communication, such as lack of (1) collaboration early in project development between local offices and the Office of Construction and Facilities Management and (2) coordination between construction offices and the Office of Information and Technology when bringing facilities online. Measurement and evaluation. This key characteristic calls for agencies to continuously evaluate the performance of their asset management systems and implement necessary improvements to optimize the assets' value and ensure the assets reflect the organization's current goals. VA previously developed goals and measures for its program of inspections to identify maintenance and repair needs in health care settings. However, currently VA lacks goals with related measures that would evaluate its asset management processes and point the way to necessary improvements. Why GAO Did This Study VA manages a vast portfolio of real property assets, including a healthcare system that provides care at 171 VA medical centers and 1,112 outpatient sites to over 9 million veterans enrolled in the VA health care program. VA has pressing infrastructure needs, including adapting to changes in veterans' demographics and maintaining or replacing aging facilities. GAO's key characteristics of an asset management framework state that effectively managing assets requires, among other things, maintaining leadership support that provides the necessary resources; a collaborative organizational culture; and a system for evaluating and improving asset management performance. However, GAO's previous and ongoing work has found that VA continues to face challenges on these fronts. Although VA has implemented some GAO recommendations, several priority recommendations remain outstanding in areas related to asset management, such as staffing and capital planning. GAO was asked to testify about VA's management of its capital asset portfolio. This statement summarizes GAO's findings from prior reports and preliminary observations from ongoing work examining VA's capital asset management. In ongoing work, GAO reviewed VA documentation and interviewed officials from VA headquarters offices involved in asset management. GAO also interviewed personnel at a selection of eight VA medical centers and seven regional offices and from four Veterans Service Organizations about VA's asset management. For more information, contact Andrew Von Ah at (202) 512-2834 or vonaha@gao.gov.
    [Read More…]
  • United States Announces Settlement of Civil Action Addressing Clean Air Act Violations at New York City Public Schools
    In Crime News
    The United States filed suit today under the Clean Air Act (CAA) against the City of New York and the New York City Department of Education (NYCDOE) and lodged a proposed consent judgment to address the defendants’ longstanding failure to properly monitor and control harmful emissions from NYCDOE oil-fired boilers in New York City public schools. 
    [Read More…]
  • Secretary Antony J. Blinken And Chilean Foreign Minister Andres Allamand Before Their Meeting
    In Crime Control and Security News
    Antony J. Blinken, [Read More…]
  • Two Former Tennessee Correctional Officers Sentenced for Civil Rights Offenses
    In Crime News
    Two former Tennessee Department of Corrections (TDOC) Correctional Officers were sentenced today for assaulting an inmate in violation of a federal civil rights statute. 
    [Read More…]
  • Laos National Day
    In Crime Control and Security News
    Antony J. Blinken, [Read More…]
  • Q&A with the Student Who Named Ingenuity, NASA’s Mars Helicopter
    In Space
    As a longtime fan of [Read More…]
  • Secretary Antony J. Blinken Opening Remarks at the Virtual Summit for Democracy Leaders’ Plenary Session
    In Crime Control and Security News
    Antony J. Blinken, [Read More…]
  • Alternatives to Radioactive Materials: A National Strategy to Support Alternative Technologies May Reduce Risks of a Dirty Bomb
    In U.S GAO News
    What GAO Found GAO examined six common medical and industrial applications that use high-risk radioactive materials—identified through agency and expert reports—and found that three applications already have technically viable alternative technologies in many circumstances and for which there is market acceptance. For example, x-ray provides a technically viable alternative to replace cesium-137 blood irradiators, one of the common applications. Another of the applications has a technically viable alternative, though only in certain limited circumstances, and the two remaining applications do not yet have viable alternatives. For example, alternatives to replace americium-241 used in oil and gas well logging equipment, another common application, are still under development. Irradiator with Radioactive Material (left) and Alternative Technology (right) Users of applications that employ high-risk radioactive materials identified six factors they take into account when determining whether to adopt alternative technologies: technical viability of alternatives, device cost, costs to convert (such as facility renovations), disposal of radioactive materials, regulatory requirements, and liability and other potential costs associated with possessing high-risk radioactive materials. An accident at the University of Washington in May 2019 shows that liability and other potential costs would likely range from millions to billions of dollars if radioactive materials were accidentally released or used in a dirty bomb. These largely uninsured socioeconomic costs are an implicit fiscal exposure for the federal government, which could be expected to provide financial assistance. Several federal agencies and interagency entities support research and promote adoption of alternative technologies. For example, the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) has removed 355 irradiators since 2004 and subsidized the replacement of some with x-ray technology. Congress also established the goal for the NNSA to eliminate the use of cesium-137 blood irradiators in the United States by 2027. At the same time, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission licenses radioactive materials for irradiators, consistent with its mission. Currently, no strategy exists to guide federal efforts to find alternatives and reduce risk. A strategy to support alternative technologies would ensure a cohesive federal approach and potentially reduce the implicit fiscal exposure associated with addressing socioeconomic damage from a dirty bomb. Why GAO Did This Study Radioactive material, which is dangerous if mishandled, is found in many medical and industrial applications. In the hands of terrorists, it could be used to construct a radiological dispersal device, or dirty bomb, that uses conventional explosives to disperse the material. Replacing technologies that use dangerous radioactive materials with safer alternatives may help protect people and reduce potential socioeconomic costs from remediation and evacuation of affected residents. Senate Report 116-102 included a provision for GAO to review alternative technologies to applications that use radioactive materials. This report examines (1) the potential for adopting alternative technologies in the United States for the six most commonly used medical and industrial applications; (2) factors affecting adoption of alternative technologies; and (3) federal activities relating to alternative technologies in the United States. GAO reviewed relevant documents to identify potential alternative technologies, conducted interviews with users of applications that employ radioactive material to identify factors affecting adoption of alternatives, and interviewed federal officials to discuss current federal activities relating to alternative technologies.
    [Read More…]
  • Joint Statement on United States and Palestinian Authority Renewal of the U.S.-Palestinian Economic Dialogue
    In Crime Control and Security News
    Office of the [Read More…]
  • Conclusion of the Eleventh Round of the Columbia River Treaty Negotiations
    In Crime Control and Security News
    Office of the [Read More…]
  • Judiciary Launches Redesigned PACER Website
    In U.S Courts
    The Administrative Office of the U.S Courts on June 28 will launch a redesigned informational website for the Judiciary’s electronic court records system, known as PACER (Public Access to Court Electronic Records).
    [Read More…]
  • Science & Tech Spotlight: Tracing the Source of Chemical Weapons
    In U.S GAO News
    Why This Matters Some governments are suspected of using chemical weapons despite international prohibitions under the Chemical Weapons Convention. For example, sarin and VX nerve gas have been identified in attacks. Most recently, Novichok nerve agent was used in 2020. Technologies exist to identify chemical warfare agents and possibly their sources, but challenges remain in identifying the person or entity responsible. The Technology What is it? According to the Global Public Policy Institute, there have been more than 330 chemical weapons attacks since 2012. Such attacks are prohibited under the Chemical Weapons Convention. A set of methods called forensic chemical attribution has the potential to trace the chemical agent used in such attacks to a source. A set of methods called forensic chemical attribution has the potential to trace the chemical agent used in such attacks to a source. For example, investigators could use these methods to identify the geographic sources of raw materials used to make the agent, for example, or to identify the manufacturing process Such information can aid leaders in deciding on whether or how to respond to a chemical weapons attack. Figure 1. Forensic chemical attribution process How does it work? Forensic chemical attribution is a three-step process, though the third step is being developed (see Fig. 1). First, a sample is taken from a victim or the site of an attack. Second, the sample's chemical components are analyzed and identified (see Fig. 2), either at a mobile lab or at one of 18 authorized biomedical labs worldwide. Common identification methods are: Gas chromatography, which separates chemical components of a mixture and quantifies the amount of each chemical. Mass spectrometry, which measures the mass-to-charge ratio of ions (i.e., charged particles) by converting molecules to ions and separating the ions based on their molecular weight. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), which can determine the structure of a molecule by measuring the interaction between atomic nuclei placed in a magnetic field and exposing it to radio waves. NMR works on is the same principle as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) used in medical diagnostics. In the third step—still under development—investigators use the data from the forensic chemical identification and analysis and identification methods from step two to develop a "chemical fingerprint." The fingerprint can be matched to a database of information on existing methods or known sources to identify chemical agents (i.e., Source A matching Sample 1 of Fig. 2). However, a comprehensive database containing complete, reliable data for known agents does not exist. How mature is it? Forensic chemical analysis and identification (i.e., Step 2 of Fig.1) is mature for known chemical agents. For example, investigators determined the nerve agent sarin was used in an attack on civilians in 2017. The methods can also identify new agents, as when investigators determined the chemical composition of the Novichok nerve agent after its first known use, in 2018. Forensic chemical analysis and identification methods are also mature enough to generate data that investigators could use as a "chemical fingerprint"– that is, a unique chemical signature that could be used in part to attribute a chemical weapon to a person or entity. For example, combining gas chromatography and mass spectrometry can provide reliable information about the chemical components and molecular weight of an agent. To achieve Step 3, scientists could use this these methods in a laboratory experiment to match impurities in chemical feedstocks of the weapon to potentially determine who made it. In an investigation, such impurities could indicate the geographic origin of the starting material and the process used to create the agent. Figure 2. Example of forensic chemical identification and analysis, showing a match between Sample 1 and Source A. Opportunities An effective international system for forensic chemical attribution can open up several opportunities, including: Defense. Knowing the source of a chemical agent could help nations better defend against future attacks and, when appropriate, take military action in response to an attack.  Legal response. Source attribution may provide information to help find and prosecute attackers or to impose sanctions. Deterrence. The ability to trace chemical agents to a source might deter future use of chemical weapons.  Challenges Chemical database. Creating a comprehensive international database of chemical fingerprints would require funding and international collaboration to sample chemicals from around the world. Finding perpetrators. Matching a chemical to its sources does not reveal who actually used it in an attack. Almost all investigations require additional evidence. Samples. Collecting a sufficient sample for attribution can be challenging, as can storing and transporting it using a secure chain of custody—potentially over great distance—to one of the 18 authorized biomedical labs worldwide. International cooperation. Lack of cooperation can delay investigations and may compromise sample quality.  Cooperation is also essential for creating an international database. Standardization. Attribution methods are complex and require standardized, internationally accepted protocols to ensure results are reliable and trusted. Such protocols do not yet exist for attributing a chemical weapons attack. Policy Context and Questions The following questions are relevant to building an effective, trusted system for tracing attacks using forensic chemical attribution: How can federal agencies promote and contribute to the international standardization of scientific methods for forensic chemical attribution? Which agency or agencies should lead this effort? How can the international community create and implement a framework for cooperation and trust in forensic chemical attribution? What actions could promote or incentivize creation of an internationally accepted database of unique chemical fingerprints for attributing chemical agents to their sources? What can be done to fully identify and address the scientific and technological gaps in current capabilities for attributing a chemical agent to its source? For more information, contact Karen Howard at (202) 512-6888 or HowardK@gao.gov.
    [Read More…]
  • Priority Open Recommendations: Department of Veterans Affairs
    In U.S GAO News
    What GAO Found In April 2020, GAO identified 33 priority recommendations for the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). Since then, VA has implemented 13 of those recommendations by, among other things, taking actions to ensure that veterans receive evidence-based mental health treatment. In May 2021, GAO identified 8 additional priority recommendations for VA, bringing the total number to 28. These recommendations involve the following areas: response to the COVID-19 pandemic; veterans’ access to timely health care; the veterans community care program; human capital management; information technology; appeals reform for disability benefits; quality of care and patient safety; veteran suicide prevention; efficiency within the VA health care system; national policy documents; procurement policies and practices; and capital planning. Addressing the high priority recommendations identified above has the potential to significantly improve VA's operations, including those related to COVID-19. Why GAO Did This Study Priority open recommendations are the GAO recommendations that warrant priority attention from heads of key departments or agencies because their implementation could save large amounts of money; improve congressional and/or executive branch decision-making on major issues; eliminate mismanagement, fraud, and abuse; or ensure that programs comply with laws and funds are legally spent, among other benefits. Since 2015 GAO has sent letters to selected agencies to highlight the importance of implementing such recommendations. For more information, contact A. Nicole Clowers at (202) 512-7114 or clowersa@gao.gov.
    [Read More…]
  • Tennessee Emergency Medical Doctor Sentenced to Prison for Unlawfully Distributing Controlled Substances
    In Crime News
    A Tennessee emergency medical doctor was sentenced today to serve 24 months in prison followed by three years of supervised release for his role in unlawfully distributing controlled substances.
    [Read More…]
  • Justice Department Settles Sexual Harassment and Retaliation Lawsuit Securing $342,500 for Two Female Firefighters and Changes to the Houston Fire Department’s Training Practices
    In Crime News
    The Justice Department announced today that it has reached a settlement with the City of Houston resolving allegations that personnel at Houston Fire Department (HFD) Station 54 discriminated and retaliated against former firefighter Jane Draycott in violation of Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Title VII is a federal statute that prohibits employment discrimination on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex and religion.   
    [Read More…]
  • Department Press Briefing – November 29, 2021
    In Crime Control and Security News
    Jalina Porter, Principal [Read More…]
  • Homeless Women Veterans: Actions Needed to Ensure Safe and Appropriate Housing
    In U.S GAO News
    What GAO FoundLimited VA data show the number of women veterans it has identified as homeless more than doubled, from 1,380 in fiscal year 2006 to 3,328 in fiscal year 2010. Although these data are not generalizable to the overall population of homeless women veterans, we identified some characteristics of these women. For example, almost two-thirds were between 40 and 59 years old and over one-third had disabilities. In addition, many of these women resided with their minor children.HUD collects data on homeless women and on homeless veterans, but does not collect detailed information on homeless women veterans. Neither VA nor HUD collect data on the total number of homeless women veterans in the general population. Further, they lack data on the characteristics and needs of these women on a national, state, and local level. Absent more complete data, VA does not have the information needed to plan services effectively, allocate grants to providers, and track progress toward its overall goal of ending veteran homelessness by 2015. According to knowledgeable VA and HUD officials we spoke with, collecting data specific to homeless women veterans would incur minimal burden and cost.Homeless women veterans were not always aware of veteran housing services, which posed a significant barrier to access, according to GPD programs we surveyed, service providers, agency officials, and experts we interviewed. Some VA Medical Center homeless coordinators reported challenges in reaching this population. However, VA has recently launched an outreach campaign to increase awareness that includes materials specific to homeless women veterans.VA requires its staff to give homeless veterans a referral for shelter or short-term housing while they await placement in veteran housing; however, several homeless women veterans told us they did not receive such referrals. In addition, about 24 percent of VA Medical Center homeless coordinators indicated not having referral plans or processes in place for temporarily housing homeless women veterans while they await placement in HUD-VASH and GPD programs. According to our data analysis, women veterans waited an average of 4 months before securing HUD-VASH housing. In addition, about one fourth of GPD providers reported that women veterans had to wait for placement in their programs and the median wait was 30 days. Without referrals for shelter or temporary housing during these waits, homeless women veterans may be at risk of physical harm and further trauma on the streets or in other unsafe places.More than 60 percent of surveyed GPD programs that serve homeless women veterans did not house children, and most programs that did house children had restrictions on the ages or numbers of children. In our survey, GPD providers cited lack of housing for women with children as a significant barrier to accessing veteran housing. In addition, several noted there were financial disincentives for providers, as VA does not have the statutory authority to reimburse them for costs of housing veterans’ children. Limited housing for women and their children puts these families at risk of remaining homeless.Homeless women veterans we talked to cited safety concerns about GPD housing, and 9 of the 142 GPD programs we surveyed indicated that there had been reported incidents of sexual harassment or assault on women residents in the past 5 years. GPD providers also cited safety concerns as a barrier to accessing veteran housing. In response to a recent report by the VA Inspector General, VA has begun to evaluate safety and security arrangements at GPD programs that serve women. However, VA does not have gender-specific safety and security standards for its GPD housing, potentially putting women veterans at risk of sexual harassment or assault. While VA is taking steps—such as launching an outreach campaign—to end homelessness among all veterans, it does not have sufficient data about the population and needs of women veterans to plan effectively for increases in their numbers as servicemembers return from Iraq and Afghanistan. Further, without improved services, women—including those with children and those who have experienced military sexual trauma—remain at risk of homelessness and experiencing further abuse.Why GAO Did This StudyAs more women serve in the military, the number of women veterans has grown substantially, doubling from 4 percent of all veterans in 1990 to 8 percent, or an estimated 1.8 million, today. The number of women veterans will continue to increase as servicemembers return from the conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan. Some of these women veterans, like their male counterparts, face challenges readjusting to civilian life and are at risk of becoming homeless. Such challenges may be particularly pronounced for those women veterans who have disabling psychological conditions resulting from military sexual trauma and for those who are single mothers.The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) has committed to ending homelessness among all veterans by 2015 and funds several programs to house homeless veterans. The two largest are the VA Homeless Providers Grant and Per Diem (GPD) program, which provides transitional housing and supportive services; and HUD-VA Supportive Housing (HUD-VASH), which is a joint program of the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and VA offering permanent supportive housing.While these programs have expanded in recent years to serve more veterans, it remains unclear whether they are meeting the housing needs of all homeless women veterans. To respond to your interest in this issue, this report addresses (1) What is known about the characteristics of homeless women veterans, including those with disabilities? (2) What barriers, if any, do homeless women veterans face in accessing and using VA’s Homeless Providers Grant and Per Diem and HUD-VA Supportive Housing programs?For more information, contact Daniel Bertoni at (202) 512-7215 or bertonid@gao.gov.
    [Read More…]
  • Saint Vincent and The Grenadines Travel Advisory
    In Travel
    Reconsider travel to [Read More…]

Crime

Network News © 2005 Area.Control.Network™ All rights reserved.