January 25, 2022

News

News Network

Secretary Michael R. Pompeo and Bahraini Foreign Minister Al Zayani at the U.S.-Bahrain Strategic Dialogue

14 min read

Michael R. Pompeo, Secretary of State

Washington, DC

SECRETARY POMPEO:  Well, look, good morning from Washington, and good afternoon, Foreign Minister Al Zayani, and to everyone joining from Bahrain.

It’s a pleasure to kick off our first-ever bilateral strategic dialogue.

Look, our two countries have been working together for a long time.  But today is a testament to how President Trump has joined with King Hamad to make our decades-old ties even closer, for the benefit of both of our nations.

It’s been a privilege for me personally to work with His Majesty the King as well, and all the more so because he spent some time studying at the United States Army Command and General Staff College in my home state, the great state of Kansas here in America.

Together, our two teams have achieved historic outcomes for the entire Middle East.  I’m very confident that what we’re doing today, this dialogue and the sessions that will follow, will lay a foundation for more successes, and frankly an even stronger alliance.

I want to start with security – the focus of multiple working sessions.

You’ve helped us defeat ISIS, launching airstrikes against the fraudulent caliphate.

Bahrain also hosts the United States Naval Central Command and our Fifth Fleet’s headquarters.  That allows lots for us.  That allows us to collaborate across the board, from fighting terrorism to safeguarding the passage of goods in the Gulf, free from Iran’s maritime attacks.

Indeed, the regime in Tehran is the number-one threat to Gulf security, and to peace-loving people throughout the entire region.

And I want to thank you all.  I want to thank Bahrain and its people for their steadfast support of our maximum pressure campaign, which has successfully isolated Tehran and cut off tens of billions of dollars for Iranian malign influence and terror.

Bahrain and the United States share a key foreign policy insight:  We’re realists; we see the world as it is.

We recognize the violent nature of the revolutionary Iranian regime, and we understand that when it comes to countering Tehran and many other important issues, Israel is a key partner, and not a problem.

Thanks to the Abraham Accords, partnerships with Israel and the United States are now blossoming.  In fact, just what’s now last month the United States hosted our first Strategic Dialogue with the United Arab Emirates, another signatory.

Look, there’s already more trade and investment between Bahrain and Israel in areas like telecom and financial services in just a handful of weeks.

Indeed, when I was in Israel just a couple weeks back now, I greeted the first direct flight from Bahrain carrying the first cabinet-level delegation, including the foreign minister himself.  We held a trilateral meeting to build on our progress, including by opening the door for an exchange of embassies between Israel and Bahrain.

This is a sign of hope for the region as it moves past stale, outdated thinking to which no one should want to return.

And I am confident more nations will follow Bahrain’s leadership, showing the geographic size of a country does not dictate its influence on the world stage.

Together – together, we’ve proven what works.  There’s more to do; there always is.

Over the next couple weeks, five working groups from the State Department and other agencies will meet with their Bahraini counterparts.

They’ll discuss how we can make sure that our two nations coordinate more in areas like military training and on women’s empowerment.

It’s also important that our future 5G networks are safe from the Chinese Communist Party and malign operators like Huawei.

So, too, is standing up for human rights and combating human trafficking – areas in which Bahrain has made tremendous, real progress.

FOREIGN MINISTER AL ZAYANI:  Thank you, sir.

SECRETARY POMPEO:  I’m happy.  Our bilateral relationship is a powerful force for good – let’s keep together to deliver positive results.

Foreign Minister Al Zayani, thank you and the people of Bahrain for your friendship with the United States of America.  Thank you.

FOREIGN MINISTER AL ZAYANI:  Thank you, sir.  Thank you, Secretary Pompeo.  Thank you for your kind remarks.  Excellencies, distinguished participants, good morning for all those in D.C.  Good afternoon for those in Bahrain, and good afternoon for those who are joining us in Israel.  Sheikh Abdullah is there on an official visit.  Sheikh Abdullah, welcome.  I am delighted to welcome you all to this Strategic Dialogue meeting, and I want to thank you, Secretary Pompeo, and all your colleagues for joining us.

May I start by expressing appreciation for how strongly U.S.-Bahrain relations have grown over so many decades, repeatedly proving their value to both sides.  Today, they take in the full range of political, economic, security, and cultural ties, making this a truly strategic partnership.  Given this broad scope, it is also valuable to zoom out, and from this perspective, to analyze how we can most effectively move forward to maximize the benefits of our countries and the region.  So I greatly welcome these meetings as an opportunity to do just that, and I appreciate the engagement of so many agencies from both sides, corresponding to the wide scope of our agenda.

Ladies and gentlemen, I want to say a few words on the Kingdom Bahrain’s vision for the next 25 years of bilateral ties, the opportunities and challenges, and our aspirations for a broader and closer partnership across a range of issues.  I do so against the backdrop of a momentous 2020.  COVID has brought unprecedented health, social, and economic challenges across the globe.  Rebuilding from these will be among the defining issues of the next few years, and effective international cooperation will be critical.

And in the last few months, the Abraham Accords have seen a step change in the dynamics of the Middle East and a renewed optimism towards peace and prosperity.  These goals are central to our country’s shared vision, and I am convinced also that the Bahrain-U.S. partnership will be key to achieving them.  So today, I want to focus on Bahrain’s vision for bilateral relations, specifically in their security and economic assets, and how these can contribute to the wider Middle East.

Firstly, security:  For 70 or 75 years, the Bahrain-U.S. partnership has been a bedrock of Gulf security, and from Bahrain’s perspective, we see this role continuing and growing in importance.  But it will also come under renewed challenge from parties seeking to undermine Middle East stability.  Primarily, that means Iran, whose malign intent and activities are more blatant than ever.  From its nuclear program to its ballistic missiles, from its interference in other states to its increasingly overt involvement in conflicts, Iran today challenges regional security as aggressively as at any time in recent history.  It is therefore essential that the international community maintains its resolve to recognize and confront such behavior, with unrelenting pressure on Iran to become a responsible actor.  We want our partnership with the United States to be an integral part of this process in exposing the ongoing challenges of the theocratic regime and its proxies, but also in ensuring that Bahrain and other regional allies continue to have the capabilities to effectively protect their peoples against such threats.

More broadly, I am confident that the coming quarter century will also see intensified bilateral cooperation on a range of security issues.  These will build on current successful counterterrorism, counter piracy, and maritime security efforts, but they will also take in emerging challenges, where the close and effective cooperation between our respective military and civilian agencies will again prove its value.

Beyond that, the Abraham Accords hold out the possibility of a reconfigured Middle East architecture based on cooperation rather than confrontation.  Here too, Bahrain-U.S. relations will be important, both in sustaining the regional security necessary to encourage wider engagement in the process, but also by demonstrating in word and deed the benefits of doing so.  So I have no doubt that a central part of both our countries’ vision for the coming years will be to build on these agreements to advance security and prosperity across the Middle East.

Turning to the economic aspect, once again, we have solid foundations based on our 2004 FTA, but also on our shared values of transparency, open markets, fair competition, labor standards, and technology.  These are values we in Bahrain will continue to promote while ensuring that our dynamic modern economy remains an attractive trade and investment proposition for U.S. and other companies, because Bahrain’s vision for the Middle East is not just security, but prosperity, and prosperity in which all the region’s peoples ever seek.  That was one of the reasons we hosted last year’s Peace to Prosperity workshop in Manama, and why we have moved so quickly to ensure that establishing diplomatic relations with Israel leads to a genuine, warm peace and the rapid development of economic, cultural, and people-to-people ties.

We want to see more trade among the countries of the region, partly to spread prosperity, but also to build interdependence and prove the benefits of cooperation.  If we can demonstrate that working together lifts the prosperity and life chances of all our citizens, then we will have the best possible guarantor of enduring regional security.  So we see Bahrain and the United States continue to deepen their economic partnership, increasing trade and investment between them, while also drawing in other like-minded seats to create a network of Middle East prosperity.  Bilaterally, there are many opportunities for further cooperation, as will be reflected in tomorrow’s trade and investment session.  In petrochemicals, for example, U.S. expertise can be instrumental in tapping the significant reserves confirmed in 2018, while there is great scope for American partnership, with Bahrain’s vision, leading banking and fintech sector.  In 25 years, therefore, Bahrain’s vision is for closer and deeper economic partnership with the United States, one which is the centerpiece of a stable, thriving region.

Ladies and gentlemen, I want to conclude by expressing confidence that Bahrain’s ties with the United States will continue to develop strongly not just in the areas I outlined, but across the full range of our relationship.  As they do so, I hope that it will be supplemented by intensified cooperation and interconnection with other like-minded regional states who share our values and our goal of a peaceful, secure, and prosperous Middle East.

Thank you, Mr. Secretary, and thank you all.

SECRETARY POMPEO:  Thank you.

More from: Michael R. Pompeo, Secretary of State

News Network

  • United States to Host Global Fund’s Seventh Replenishment Conference
    In Crime Control and Security News
    Antony J. Blinken, [Read More…]
  • Afghanistan Security: Some Improvements Reported in Afghan Forces’ Capabilities, but Actions Needed to Enhance DOD Oversight of U.S.-Purchased Equipment
    In U.S GAO News
    What GAO Found Since the Resolute Support mission began in 2015, the Afghan National Defense and Security Forces (ANDSF) have improved some fundamental capabilities, such as high-level operational planning, but continue to rely on U.S. and coalition support to fill several key capability gaps, according to Department of Defense (DOD) reporting. DOD has initiatives to address some ANDSF capability gaps, such as a country-wide vehicle maintenance and training effort, but DOD reports it does not expect the ANDSF to develop and sustain independent capabilities in some areas, such as logistics, for several years. Examples of U.S.-Purchased Equipment for the Afghan National Defense and Security Forces While DOD has firsthand information on the abilities of the Afghan Air Force and Special Security Forces to operate and maintain U.S.-purchased equipment, it has little reliable information on the equipment proficiency of conventional ANDSF units. U.S. and coalition advisors are embedded at the tactical level for the Air Force and Special Security Forces, enabling DOD to directly assess those forces' abilities. However, the advisors have little direct contact with conventional ANDSF units on the front lines. As a result, DOD relies on those units' self-assessments of tactical abilities, which, according to DOD officials, can be unreliable. GAO's analysis of three critical equipment types illustrated the varying degrees of DOD's information (see figure above). For example, DOD provided detailed information about the Air Force's ability to operate and maintain MD-530 helicopters and the Special Security Forces' ability to operate and maintain Mobile Strike Force Vehicles; however, DOD had limited information about how conventional forces operate and maintain radios and Mobile Strike Force Vehicles. DOD's lack of reliable information on conventional forces' equipment operations and maintenance abilities adds to the uncertainty and risk in assessing the progress of DOD efforts in Afghanistan. Why GAO Did This Study Developing independently capable ANDSF is a key component of U.S. and coalition efforts to create sustainable security and stability in Afghanistan under the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO)-led Resolute Support mission. The United States is the largest contributor of funding and personnel to Resolute Support, providing and maintaining ANDSF equipment, along with training, advising, and assistance to help the ANDSF effectively use and sustain the equipment in the future. House Report 114-537 included a provision for GAO to review the ANDSF's capability and capacity to operate and sustain U.S.-purchased weapon systems and equipment. This report addresses (1) what has been reported about ANDSF capabilities and capability gaps and (2) the extent to which DOD has information about the ANDSF's ability to operate and maintain U.S.-purchased equipment. To conduct this work, GAO analyzed DOD and NATO reports and documents, examined three critical equipment types, and interviewed DOD officials in the United States and Afghanistan. This is a public version of a sensitive report issued in September 2018. Information that DOD deemed sensitive has been omitted.
    [Read More…]
  • Marine Corps Civilian Employee Pleads Guilty to Assaulting His Spouse
    In Crime News
    A civilian employee working for the U.S. Marine Corps Community Association pleaded guilty today to assaulting his spouse while working in Iwakuni, Japan.
    [Read More…]
  • Justice Department Statement on Law Enforcement Assistance to the Haitian Government
    In Crime News
    The U.S. Department of Justice today released the following statement from spokesman Anthony Coley on department efforts to provide law enforcement assistance to the people and Government of Haiti:
    [Read More…]
  • Timor-Leste National Day
    In Crime Control and Security News
    Antony J. Blinken, [Read More…]
  • Justice Department Announces $139 Million for Law Enforcement Hiring to Advance Community Policing
    In Crime News
    The Department of Justice today announced more than $139 million in grant funding through the department’s Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS Office) COPS Hiring Program (CHP). The awards provide direct funding to 183 law enforcement agencies across the nation, allowing those agencies to hire 1,066 additional full-time law enforcement professionals.
    [Read More…]
  • Former CEO and Founder of Technology Company Pleads Guilty to Investment Fraud Scheme
    In Crime News
    The former chief executive officer (CEO) and co-founder of Trustify, Inc. (Trustify), a privately-held technology company founded in 2015 and based in Arlington, Virginia, pleaded guilty today to his involvement in a fraud scheme resulting in millions of dollars of losses to investors.
    [Read More…]
  • Gangster Disciple gang member handed significant sentence for multiple offenses
    In Justice News
    A 34-year-old Houston [Read More…]
  • Secretary Blinken’s Meeting with Japanese Foreign Minister Motegi and Republic of Korea Foreign Minister Chung
    In Crime Control and Security News
    Office of the [Read More…]
  • Readout of Acting CT Coordinator Godfrey’s Travel to Malta
    In Crime Control and Security News
    Office of the [Read More…]
  • Former President of Nuclear Transportation Company Sentenced to Prison for Foreign Bribery and Other Offenses
    In Crime News
    The former president of Transport Logistics International Inc. (TLI), a Maryland-based transportation company that provides services for the transportation of nuclear materials to customers in the United States and abroad, was sentenced today to 48 months in prison and three years of supervised release for his role in a scheme to bribe a Russian official in exchange for obtaining contracts for the company.
    [Read More…]
  • Former employee admits to stealing over $400,000
    In Justice News
    The former controlling [Read More…]
  • Judiciary Seeks $1.54 Billion for Infrastructure
    In U.S Courts
    Citing “crucial infrastructure needs for courthouse security, courthouse construction, and information technology,” the Judiciary is asking Congress for $1.54 billion as part of any infrastructure bill enacted by the legislative branch.
    [Read More…]
  • Illegal Iranian Flow of Weapons to Yemen
    In Crime Control and Security News
    Ned Price, Department [Read More…]
  • Addressing Fragmentation, Overlap, and Duplication: Progress in Enhancing Government Effectiveness and Achieving Hundreds of Billions of Dollars in Financial Benefits
    In U.S GAO News
    What GAO Found Congress and executive branch agencies have made significant progress in addressing many of the 1,200 actions that GAO identified from 2011 to 2021 to reduce costs, increase revenues, and improve agencies’ operating effectiveness, although work remains to fully address them. As shown in the figure below, these efforts have resulted in approximately $515 billion in financial benefits, an increase of $85 billion from GAO’s 2020 annual report. These are rough estimates based on a variety of sources that considered different time periods and used different data sources, assumptions, and methodologies. Total Reported Financial Benefits of $515 Billion, as of 2021 To achieve these benefits, as of August 2021, Congress and executive branch agencies have fully addressed 666 (56 percent) of the 1,200 actions GAO identified from 2011 to 2021 and partially addressed 207 (17 percent). Examples of actions taken that led to significant financial benefits include: Congress increased the passenger security fee from a prior boarding payment structure to a flat fee, resulting in increased revenues of about $12.9 billion over a 10-year period beginning in 2014 through 2023. The Department of Health and Human Services changed its spending limit determinations for Medicaid demonstrations, resulting in federal savings of approximately $120.8 billion from 2016 through 2020, with tens of billions of additional savings to potentially accrue in the future. Further steps are needed to fully address the actions GAO identified from 2011 to 2021. While GAO is no longer tracking 93 actions due to changing circumstances, GAO estimates that fully addressing the remaining 441 open actions could result in savings of tens of billions of dollars and improved government services, among other benefits. For example: The Department of Energy may be able to reduce certain risks by adopting alternative approaches to treating a portion of its low-activity radioactive waste, saving tens of billions of dollars. Enhanced Internal Revenue Service enforcement and service capabilities can help reduce the gap between taxes owed and paid by collecting billions in tax revenue and facilitating voluntary compliance. The Department of Veterans Affairs could manage fragmentation and improve access to long-term care for veterans by implementing a more consistent approach to this care. Why GAO Did This Study The federal government continues to respond to and recover from significant public health and economic challenges battling the COVID-19 pandemic. While the size and scope of these efforts demand strong accountability and continued agility, opportunities also exist for achieving billions of dollars in financial savings and improving the efficiency and effectiveness of a wide range of federal programs in other areas. GAO has responded with annual reports to a statutory provision directing it to identify and report on federal programs, agencies, offices, and initiatives—either within departments or government-wide. These entities and initiatives have duplicative, overlapping, or fragmented goals or activities, as well as additional opportunities to achieve cost savings or enhance revenue collection. This report discusses the progress Congress and executive branch agencies have made in addressing actions GAO identified in its 2011 to 2021 reports. Additionally, the report provides examples of open actions where further steps by Congress and executive branch agencies could yield significant financial and non-financial benefits. For more information, contact Jessica Lucas-Judy at (202)512-6806 or lucasjudyj@gao.gov, or Michelle Sager at (202)512-6806 or sagerm@gao.gov..
    [Read More…]
  • Provincial Reconstruction Teams in Afghanistan and Iraq
    In U.S GAO News
    U.S.-led Provincial Reconstruction Teams (PRT) are designed to help improve stability in Afghanistan and Iraq by increasing the host nation's capacity to govern; enhancing economic viability; and strengthening local governments' ability to deliver public services, such as security and health care. PRTs are a means of coordinating interagency diplomatic, economic, reconstruction, and counterinsurgency efforts among various U.S. agencies in Afghanistan and Iraq. PRTs are intended to be interim structures; after a PRT has achieved its goal of improving stability, it may be dismantled to allow traditional development efforts to occur. In Afghanistan, the first PRTs were created in 2002 with the mission of facilitating security and reconstruction by helping the central government extend its authority to the provinces. Since then, PRTs have expanded their purpose to include strengthening local governance and community development. In Iraq, PRTs were initiated in 2005 with the mission to increase the capacity of provincial and local governments to govern effectively and, for newer embedded PRTs (ePRT), to support moderates and assist in the military's counterinsurgency efforts. To accomplish their missions, PRTs engage in and fund a variety of activities, such as developing the capacity of local governments through engagement with local stakeholders; promoting budget execution, business development, agriculture, public health initiatives, and governance; and supporting the delivery of basic social services. This report describes (1) the organization, staffing, and funding for PRTs in Afghanistan and (2) the organization, staffing, and funding for PRTs in Iraq. It excludes information marked "Sensitive but Unclassified" in our September 26, 2008, report on PRTs. Due to broad congressional interest in issues related to Iraq and Afghanistan, we completed this report under the Comptroller General's authority to conduct evaluations on his own initiative.Afghanistan, as of May 2008, the United States was leading 12 of 26 PRTs and 13 other coalition countries were leading the remaining 14 PRTs. All PRTs in Afghanistan are under ISAF's operational command, but individual nations, including the United States, lead PRTs and determine their size and structure. U.S.-led PRTs in Afghanistan are led by DOD and are composed primarily of U.S. military personnel. As of April 2008, 10 of the 12 U.S.-led PRTs included 88 or more military personnel--the majority of whom provide security and other support for the PRTs--and 3 civilian personnel from State, USAID, and USDA. The total number of U.S. government personnel assigned to U.S. PRTs in Afghanistan increased slightly from 1,023 personnel in 2007 to 1,055 personnel in 2008--which includes 1,021 military personnel from DOD and 34 civilian personnel from State, USAID, and USDA. DOD is responsible for paying nearly all of the costs associated with operating PRTs, such as providing their security and life support. However, DOD officials reported that DOD does not track PRT operating costs separately from other operational costs for Afghanistan. State, USAID, and USDA do not reimburse DOD for its support to civilian PRT officials in Afghanistan. PRTs have one source of programmatic funding available for projects in Afghanistan. PRT commanders can approve the use of funds for projects under DOD's Commander's Emergency Response Program (CERP) up to $25,000 per project. PRTs in Afghanistan may also coordinate with other U.S.-funded programs, including other commanders' CERP projects and USAID programs, such as the Local Governance and Community Development project. In Iraq, as of August 2008, the United States was leading 28 of 31 PRTs and other coalition countries were leading 3 PRTs. As of August 2008, three types of U.S.-led PRTs were operating in Iraq: 11 PRTs at the provincial level of government; 13 ePRTs embedded with U.S. brigade combat teams and operating in local governments in Baghdad, Anbar, Babil, and Diyala provinces; and 4 Provincial Support Teams (PST), which are smaller PRTs that cannot be based in the intended province due to security concerns. According to State and DOD officials, the number of personnel assigned to PRTs and ePRTs in Iraq increased from an estimated 100 to 125 personnel in early 2007 to about 450 in July 2008. This increase was the result of the Administration's decision in January 2007 to create ePRTs and to increase the size of PRTs in support of The New Way Forward. DOD and civilian agencies have staffed the PRTs with a mix of U.S. government employees--permanent and temporary--and contractors. State reimburses DOD for some operating costs of ePRTs and most PRTs, based on a quarterly estimate for each PRT member. State's reimbursements do not cover the costs of PRT security and transportation provided by the U.S. military. According to DOD, as of April 2008, State had reimbursed $11 million to DOD for operating costs--$5.9 million for fiscal year 2007 and $5.1 million for the first quarter of fiscal year 2008. State had also obligated $125 million for PRT movement security from September 2005 through May 2008 for PRTs in Iraq that are not embedded with U.S. military units or do not have access to military movement assets.
    [Read More…]
  • Investing in Diversity and Inclusion at State
    In Crime Control and Security News
    Antony J. Blinken, [Read More…]
  • Secretary Blinken’s Meeting with Egyptian Foreign Minister Shoukry
    In Crime Control and Security News
    Office of the [Read More…]
  • The United States Announces New Humanitarian Aid in Central America and Mexico 
    In Crime Control and Security News
    Ned Price, Department [Read More…]
  • Veterans Community Care Program: Improvements Needed to Help Ensure Timely Access to Care
    In U.S GAO News
    In a September 2020 report, GAO found that the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) established an appointment scheduling process for its new Veterans Community Care Program (VCCP) but did not specify allowable wait times for some key steps in the process. Further, GAO found that VA had not established an overall wait-time performance measure—that is, the maximum amount of time it should take for veterans to receive care from community providers. In 2013, GAO recommended that VA establish a wait-time measure under a prior VA community care program, and in 2018 again recommended that VA establish an achievable wait-time goal to receive care under the VCCP. VA has not implemented these recommendations. Potential Allowable Wait Time to Obtain Care through the Veterans Community Care Program Note: This figure illustrates potential allowable wait times in calendar days for eligible veterans who are referred to the Veterans Community Care Program through routine referrals (not urgent), and have VA medical center staff—Referral Coordination Team (RCT) and community care staff (CC staff)—schedule the appointments on their behalf. Given VA's lack of action over the prior 7 years in implementing wait-time measures for various community care programs, GAO believes that Congressional action is warranted requiring VA to establish such an overall measure for the VCCP. This should help to achieve timely health care for veterans. GAO found additional VCCP challenges needing VA action: (1) VA uses metrics that are remnants from the previous community care program and inconsistent with the time frames established in the VCCP scheduling process. (2) Few community providers have signed up to use the software VA intends for VA medical center (VAMC) staff and community providers to use to electronically share referral information with each other. (3) Select VAMCs faced challenges scheduling appointments in a timely manner and most did not have the full amount of community care staff VA's staffing tool recommended. In June 2019, VA implemented its new community care program, the VCCP, as required by the VA MISSION Act of 2018. This new program replaced or consolidated prior community care programs. Under the VCCP, VAMC staff are responsible for community care appointment scheduling. This statement summarizes GAO's September 2020 report. It describes for the VCCP: (1) the appointment scheduling process that VA established for veterans, (2) the metrics VA used to monitor the timeliness of appointment scheduling, (3) VA's efforts to prepare VAMC staff for appointment scheduling, and (4) VA's efforts to determine VAMC staffing needs. In performing that work, GAO reviewed VA documentation, such as guidance, referral timeliness data, and VAMC community care staffing data; conducted site visits to five VAMCs; and interviewed VA and VAMC officials. In its September 2020 report, GAO recommended that Congress consider requiring VA to establish an overall wait-time measure for the VCCP. GAO also made three recommendations to VA, including that it align its monitoring metrics with the VCCP appointment scheduling process. VA did not concur with this recommendation, but concurred with the other two. GAO maintains that all recommendations are warranted. For more information, contact Sharon M. Silas at (202) 512-7114 or silass@gao.gov.
    [Read More…]

Crime

Network News © 2005 Area.Control.Network™ All rights reserved.