December 3, 2021

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Secretary Blinken’s Travel to Kenya, Nigeria, and Senegal

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Ned Price, Department Spokesperson

Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken will visit Kenya, Nigeria, and Senegal from November 15-20, underscoring the depth and breadth of our relationships with African partners.  During the visit, the Secretary will advance U.S.-Africa collaboration on shared global priorities, including ending the COVID-19 pandemic and building back to a more inclusive global economy, combatting the climate crisis, revitalizing our democracies, and advancing peace and security.

Secretary Blinken will begin his trip in Nairobi, where he will meet with Kenyan President Uhuru Kenyatta and Cabinet Secretary for Foreign Affairs Ambassador Raychelle Omamo, affirming our strategic partnership with Kenya.  The Secretary and representatives of the Kenyan government will discuss our shared interests as members of the UN Security Council, including addressing regional security issues such as Ethiopia, Somalia, and Sudan.  The Secretary will advance U.S.-Kenyan cooperation on ending COVID-19, improving clean energy access, and protecting the environment.  The Secretary will underscore U.S. support for a peaceful and inclusive Kenyan election in 2022.

Secretary Blinken will then travel to Abuja, where he will meet with President Muhammadu Buhari, Vice President Yemi Osinbajo, and Foreign Minister Geoffrey Onyeama and discuss furthering cooperation on global health security, expanding energy access and economic growth, and revitalizing democracy.  The Secretary will deliver a speech on U.S.-Africa policy in the capital of Africa’s largest democracy.  Additionally, the Secretary will engage with Nigerian entrepreneurs in the digital sector. 

The Secretary will conclude his trip in Dakar, where he will meet with President Macky Sall and Foreign Minister Aïssata Tall Sall to reaffirm the close partnership between our two countries.  Given President Sall’s upcoming African Union chairmanship, Secretary Blinken looks forward to discussing regional issues and shared values.  The Secretary will engage in events that highlight America’s strong commercial relationship with Senegal, amplify the role of female Senegalese entrepreneurs, and showcase the U.S. partnership to combat the COVID-19 pandemic.  

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