December 4, 2021

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Secretary Blinken’s Participation in the Virtual NATO Foreign Ministerial

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Office of the Spokesperson

Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken participated today in the virtual NATO Foreign Ministerial hosted by NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg.  Secretary Blinken discussed the upcoming NATO Summit and reaffirmed U.S. commitment to NATO, highlighting the Administration’s priority to revitalize our alliances.  The Secretary expressed support for Secretary General Stoltenberg’s efforts to adapt the Alliance through the NATO 2030 initiative, making it more resilient and capable of confronting systemic challenges from Russia and the People’s Republic of China and responding to emerging and evolving challenges, including climate change and hybrid and cyber threats.  Secretary Blinken underscored the importance of Alliance partnerships, including NATO-EU cooperation, and encouraged NATO to deepen its cooperation with Australia, Japan, New Zealand, and the Republic of Korea.

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