January 25, 2022

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Secretary Blinken’s Meeting with Ukrainian President Zelenskyy

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Office of the Spokesperson

The below is attributable to Spokesperson Ned Price:

Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken met with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy today in Glasgow on the margins of COP26.  Secretary Blinken reaffirmed the United States’ unwavering support for Ukraine’s sovereignty, independence, and territorial integrity.  He welcomed Ukraine’s steps to address corruption and underscored that, together with our allies and partners, the United States would continue to reinforce Ukrainian energy security, including by reducing the risks posed by the Nord Stream 2 pipeline.

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