December 9, 2021

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Secretary Blinken’s Meeting with Nigerian President Buhari

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Office of the Spokesperson

The below is attributable to Spokesperson Ned Price:

Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken met today with Nigerian President Buhari in Abuja.  They discussed U.S.-Nigeria cooperation on the shared priorities of climate and the COVID-19 pandemic, including U.S. support for Nigeria’s renewable energy sector and the delivery of nearly eight million Pfizer and Moderna vaccine doses provided by the United States. They noted the importance of strengthening democracy in West Africa and reinforcing the democratic principles of a free press and digital freedom, peaceful protest and dissent, as well as respect for human rights. They further discussed Nigeria’s security challenges and efforts to protect civilians.  The Secretary reaffirmed with President Buhari the strong partnership between the United States and Nigeria, which is founded upon shared democratic ideals and a spirit of transparency and cooperation. 

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