December 5, 2021

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Secretary Blinken’s Meeting with Kenyan Cabinet Secretary for Foreign Affairs Omamo

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Office of the Spokesperson

The below is attributable to Spokesperson Ned Price:‎

Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken met today with Kenyan Cabinet Secretary for Foreign Affairs Raychelle Omamo.  Secretary Blinken and Cabinet Secretary Omamo reaffirmed the importance of the U.S.-Kenya strategic partnership, highlighting shared global priorities including responding to the COVID-19 pandemic, addressing climate change, and investing in democracy and security in Africa.  Secretary Blinken and Cabinet Secretary Omamo discussed the importance of Kenyan engagement on the ongoing crises in Ethiopia and South Sudan.  Secretary Blinken affirmed the United States’ commitment to maintain a strategic dialogue with Kenya.

 

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