December 8, 2021

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Secretary Blinken’s Meeting with French President Macron

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Office of the Spokesperson

The below is attributable to Spokesperson Ned Price:

Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken met today with French President Emmanuel Macron in Paris to discuss our shared commitments to Transatlantic security and to the enduring NATO Alliance. Secretary Blinken and President Macron emphasized the shared goals of establishing a stable and predictable relationship with Moscow while addressing Russia’s aggressive and irresponsible behavior, including towards Ukraine. They discussed Transatlantic cooperation in addressing the People’s Republic of China’s coercive economic practices and attempts at undermining the rules-based international order. Secretary Blinken and President Macron exchanged views on countering terrorist threats, supporting democracy, and joint efforts to improve the capacity of our African partners in the Sahel region. They also discussed efforts underway with African and other partners to address the humanitarian and human rights crises in Tigray, while emphasizing the need for Lebanon’s leaders to come together for the good of the Lebanese people.

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