December 5, 2021

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Secretary Blinken’s Meeting with Domestic Refugee Resettlement Agencies

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Office of the Spokesperson

The below is attributable to Spokesperson Ned Price:

Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken met with executives from domestic refugee resettlement agencies today in Washington, D.C., alongside the state refugee coordinators for Maryland and Virginia.  Secretary Blinken and the leaders of these resettlement agencies emphasized the importance of ensuring relocated Afghans arriving through Operation Allies Welcome have a safe start in American communities around the country, which are offering a warm welcome to our Afghan allies and new neighbors.  The Secretary thanked the agencies, representatives of state governments, and their respective communities across the United States for their close collaboration in this historic effort to provide life-saving support and a new start for our Afghan allies and their families.

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