December 5, 2021

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Secretary Blinken’s Call with Sudanese Prime Minister Hamdok

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Office of the Spokesperson

The following is attributable to Spokesperson Ned Price:

Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken spoke today with Sudanese Prime Minister Abdalla Hamdok. The Secretary welcomed the Prime Minister’s release from custody and reiterated his call on Sudanese military forces to release all civilian leaders in detention and to ensure their safety. He also expressed his deep concern about the ongoing military takeover and repeated the imperative for military forces to use restraint and avoid violence in responding to demonstrators. The Secretary emphasized U.S. support for the civilian-led transition to democracy and for a return to the principles of Sudan’s transitional framework, as laid out in the 2019 Constitutional Declaration and the 2020 Juba Peace Agreement. He noted the growing chorus of international voices condemning the military takeover and supporting the calls by the Sudanese people for civilian leadership, democracy, and peace.

 

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