December 9, 2021

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Secretary Blinken’s Call with Sudanese Prime Minister Hamdok and Sovereign Council Chair General Burhan

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Office of the Spokesperson

The following is attributable to Spokesperson Ned Price:

Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken spoke today with Sudanese Prime Minister Abdalla Hamdok and separately with General Abdel Fattah al-Burhan, Chair of Sudan’s Sovereign Council.  The Secretary encouraged both leaders to work rapidly to put Sudan’s democratic transition back on track.  He recognized the important first step that had been taken with the release and reinstatement to office of Prime Minister Hamdok but noted the outstanding transitional tasks.  To restore public confidence in the transition he urged the immediate release of all political detainees and pressed for the immediate lifting of the state of emergency.  He underscored the imperative for all parties to renew their focus on completing Sudan’s transition to democracy by implementing the transitional tasks outlined in the Constitutional Declaration and the Juba Peace Agreement.  He reiterated U.S. calls for respect for peaceful protests and called on the security forces to desist from the use of violence against demonstrators.

The Secretary urged Prime Minister Hamdok and General Burhan to take timely action to implement the elements of the agreement reached November 21 in fulfillment of the aspirations of the Sudanese people, including creating a transitional legislative council, judicial structures, electoral institutions, and a constitutional convention.  Both voiced their support for an effective and mutually beneficial U.S.-Sudan relationship.

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