January 23, 2022

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Secretary Blinken’s Call with South African Foreign Minister Pandor

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Office of the Spokesperson

The below is attributable to Spokesperson Ned Price:

Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken spoke today with South African Minister of International Relations and Cooperation Naledi Pandor to discuss the announcement lifting travel restrictions related to the Omicron variant of COVID-19. The Secretary again thanked South Africa’s scientists and government for their transparency and expertise. He emphasized the importance of the longstanding partnership between the United States and South Africa to combat the impacts of COVID-19.

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