December 3, 2021

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Secretary Blinken’s Call with Saudi Foreign Minister Prince Faisal bin Farhan Al Saud

15 min read

Office of the Spokesperson

The following is attributable to Spokesperson Ned Price:

Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken spoke today with the Foreign Minister of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, Prince Faisal bin Farhan Al Saud. The Secretary and Foreign Minister condemned the October 25 military takeover in Sudan and its effect on the stability of Sudan and the region. The Secretary reiterated the strong U.S. support to the aspirations of the Sudanese people for democracy and underscored the need for the immediate restoration of Sudan’s civilian-led transitional government.

They also discussed the importance that all parties adhere to the framework laid out in the Constitutional Declaration and Juba Peace Agreement and that failure do so put international support for Sudan at risk. The Secretary and Foreign Minister also discussed other issues important to the bilateral relationship, including human rights.

 

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