January 27, 2022

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Secretary Blinken’s Call with Saudi Foreign Minister Faisal bin Farhan Al Saud

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Office of the Spokesperson

The below is attributable to Spokesperson Ned Price:

Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken spoke today with the Foreign Minister of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, Faisal bin Farhan Al Saud.  Secretary Blinken and the Foreign Minister discussed the importance of Saudi progress on human rights, including through legal and judicial reforms, and our joint efforts to bolster Saudi defenses.  The Secretary also reiterated his commitment to U.S.-Saudi cooperation on ending the war in Yemen, regional security coordination, counterterrorism, and economic development.

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