January 25, 2022

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Secretary Blinken’s Call with Qatari Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Foreign Affairs Al-Thani

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Office of the Spokesperson

The below is attributable to Spokesperson Ned Price:

Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken spoke today with Qatari Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Foreign Affairs Mohammed bin Abdulrahman Al-Thani.  The Secretary congratulated the Foreign Minister on the historic breakthrough made with the Al-Ula Declaration at the GCC summit by Qatar and the Quartet—Bahrain, Egypt, Saudi Arabia, and the United Arab Emirates.  The decision to open their mutual borders, lift transportation restrictions, and restore diplomatic relations is a welcome step.  Secretary Blinken also thanked the Foreign Minister for Qatar’s hosting of U.S. military personnel and discussed Qatar’s support in facilitating the Afghan peace process and the importance of Gulf unity.

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