December 3, 2021

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Secretary Blinken’s Call with Polish Foreign Minister Rau

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Office of the Spokesperson

The following is attributable to Spokesperson Ned Price:

Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken spoke yesterday with Polish Foreign Minister Zbigniew Rau.  Secretary Blinken reaffirmed U.S. support for Poland in the face of the Lukashenka regime’s cynical exploitation of vulnerable migrants.  The actions by the Lukashenka regime threaten security, sow division, and aim to distract from Russia’s activities on the border with Ukraine.  Secretary Blinken and Foreign Minister Rau strongly condemned the instrumentalization of vulnerable migrants and called on Lukashenka to address the root causes of sanctions imposed by the West – the denial of human rights and fundamental freedoms for the Belarusian people.

The Secretary also expressed his deep appreciation for Poland’s vocal support for Ukraine’s sovereignty and territorial integrity. The United States, Poland, and other Allies and partners are united in imposing significant costs on Moscow for its military aggression and malign activities in the region.

 

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