January 25, 2022

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Secretary Blinken’s Call with People’s Republic of China State Councilor and Foreign Minister Wang Yi

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Office of the Spokesperson

The below is attributable to Spokesperson Ned Price:

Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken spoke today with PRC State Councilor and Foreign Minister Wang Yi about developments in Afghanistan, including the security situation and our respective efforts to bring U.S. and PRC citizens to safety.

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