December 6, 2021

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Secretary Blinken’s Call with Nigerian Foreign Minister Onyeama

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Office of the Spokesperson

The below is attributable to Spokesperson Ned Price:

Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken spoke today with Foreign Minister Geoffrey Onyeama to highlight the importance that the United States places on our relationship with Nigeria.  Secretary Blinken outlined a holistic approach to the U.S.-Nigeria partnership based on our shared values of democracy, respect for human rights, and robust people-to-people relations.  Acknowledging the threats that violent extremists pose to Nigerian and regional security, he welcomed President Buhari’s recent appointment of military service chiefs to bring new approaches to combat terrorism in the northeast and provide national security throughout the country.  Secretary Blinken referenced President Biden’s revocation of immigrant visa restrictions on Nigeria as affirmation of the close ties between Americans and Nigerians.  Secretary Blinken reiterated U.S. support for Dr. Ngozi Okonjo Iweala as the new Director General of the WTO.

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