January 20, 2022

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Secretary Blinken’s Call with NATO Secretary General Stoltenberg

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Office of the Spokesperson

The below is attributable to Spokesperson Ned Price:

Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken spoke today with NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg.  They discussed the December 7 call between President Biden and Russian President Putin and NATO’s options in response to further Russian aggression against Ukraine.  The Secretary praised the Secretary General’s ongoing efforts to increase awareness and unity within the Alliance, as well as for his organization of a successful NATO foreign ministerial meeting November 30-December 1 in Riga, Latvia.

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