December 4, 2021

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Secretary Blinken’s Call with NATO Secretary General Stoltenberg

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Office of the Spokesperson

The following is attributable to Spokesperson Ned Price:

Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken spoke today with NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg to discuss the agenda for the November 30 – December 1 NATO Foreign Ministerial and the reports of unusual Russian military activity near Ukraine. Secretary Blinken noted that he looks forward to the Foreign Ministerial in Riga and dialogue on the full range of issues facing NATO.

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