January 27, 2022

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Secretary Blinken’s Call with NATO Secretary General Stoltenberg

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Office of the Spokesperson

The below is attributable to Spokesperson Ned Price:

Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken spoke today with NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg.  Secretary Blinken and Secretary General Stoltenberg discussed next month’s NATO Summit as well as NATO’s importance to the security and prosperity of the Transatlantic community and the world.  The Secretary and the Secretary General stressed that adapting and modernizing NATO to meet the challenges of the 21st century, including by advancing the NATO 2030 initiative, is essential to ensure Transatlantic security.

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