December 4, 2021

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Secretary Blinken’s Call with Kenyan President Kenyatta

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Office of the Spokesperson

The below is attributable to Spokesperson Ned Price:

Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken spoke with Kenyan President Uhuru Kenyatta today to discuss regional security issues of mutual interest, including the situation in Ethiopia.  The Secretary thanked the President for his continued leadership to promote peace and prosperity in the region.

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