January 25, 2022

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Secretary Blinken’s Call with Guatemalan Foreign Minister Brolo

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Office of the Spokesperson

The following is attributable to Spokesperson Ned Price:

Secretary Antony J. Blinken spoke with Guatemalan Foreign Minister Pedro Brolo today. Secretary Blinken emphasized the U.S. commitment to addressing the structural problems that trigger irregular migration – endemic corruption and impunity, lack of economic opportunity, and insecurity – and our countries’ shared interest in ensuring a safe, orderly, and humane approach to migration. The two leaders discussed the importance of securing an independent judiciary, through an open and transparent process, including by designating impartial candidates in the upcoming selection of Constitutional Court magistrates. Secretary Blinken also raised the need to improve democratic governance, promote respect for human rights, and root out high-level corruption in order to advance our shared goal of a more secure and prosperous Guatemala. He noted the strong bonds between the governments and peoples of the United States and Guatemala and reaffirmed our commitment to the bilateral relationship.

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